When Novices Have More Influence Than Experts: Empirical Evidence From Online Peer Reviews

In the context of online peer reviews, the authors demonstrate when and how novices have more influence on consumers than experts. Using field data and experiment, the authors show that novices have greater influence on aggregate review measures, which is, in part, explained by novices’ more polarizing rating approach.



Citation:

Peter Nguyen, Xin (Shane) Wang, Xi Li, and June Cotte (2018) ,"When Novices Have More Influence Than Experts: Empirical Evidence From Online Peer Reviews", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 719-721.

Authors

Peter Nguyen, Ivey Business School
Xin (Shane) Wang, Western University, Canada
Xi Li, City University of Hong Kong
June Cotte, Ivey Business School



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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