Paying to Be Social? How Materialism Shapes Spending on Friends

While extant research suggests materialists are asocial, our investigation reveals a more dynamic and complete picture regarding how materialists navigate in social life. Specifically, the current research identifies the conditions and explains the reasons that materialists are willing to spend more (or, less) on friends than nonmaterialists.



Citation:

William Ding, David Sprott, and Andrew Perkins (2018) ,"Paying to Be Social? How Materialism Shapes Spending on Friends", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 527-528.

Authors

William Ding, Washington State University, USA
David Sprott, Washington State University, USA
Andrew Perkins, Washington State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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