Cheating Your Self: Diagnostic Self-Deceptive Cheating For Intrinsic Rewards

It often pays to cheat and previous research has examined cheating for extrinsic incentives (e.g., more money). Cheating for intrinsic incentives (e.g., feeling smarter), however, has not yet been examined. We find that when only intrinsic incentives are present, individuals cheat, engage in diagnostic self-deception, and subsequently enhance their self-perceptions.



Citation:

Sara Loughran Dommer and Nicole Marie Coleman (2018) ,"Cheating Your Self: Diagnostic Self-Deceptive Cheating For Intrinsic Rewards", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 270-275.

Authors

Sara Loughran Dommer, Georgia Tech, USA
Nicole Marie Coleman, University of Pittsburgh, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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