No Self to Spare: How the Cognitive Structure of the Self Influences Moral Behavior

Self-overlap describes the extent to which people perceive their various self-aspects as interconnected, such that they think of themselves similarly across self-aspects. Four studies shows people high (vs low) in self-overlap are more likely to behave ethically because they tend to see their actions as diagnostic of their overall self-concept.



Citation:

Rima Touré-Tillery and Alysson Light (2018) ,"No Self to Spare: How the Cognitive Structure of the Self Influences Moral Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 270-302.

Authors

Rima Touré-Tillery, Northwestern University, USA
Alysson Light, University of the Sciences



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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