Narrative Transportation and Cognitive Responses: the Other Side of the Story

Prior research has concluded that narrative transportation—the sensation of being “transported” into a story—robustly and positively affects persuasion. Three experiments explore the psychological process of narrative transportation to expose when stories become less persuasive than facts and how marketers can best blend stories and facts to improve persuasion.



Citation:

Rebecca Krause and Derek Rucker (2018) ,"Narrative Transportation and Cognitive Responses: the Other Side of the Story", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 662-663.

Authors

Rebecca Krause, Northwestern University, USA
Derek Rucker, Northwestern University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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