It’S About Trust: the Diffusion of Deviant Consumer Behavior

When does deviant consumer behavior become accepted as non-deviant? Addressing this, a social diffusion process is modeled, which starts with individual adoptions, builds critical mass to where the behavior once labelled as deviant, becomes mainstream, resulting in a new emergent norm. Propositions are developed, supported by a comprehensive conceptual framework.



Citation:

Peter Voyer (2018) ,"It’S About Trust: the Diffusion of Deviant Consumer Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 444-450.

Authors

Peter Voyer, University of Windsor



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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