Deny the Voice Inside: Are Accessible Attitudes Always Beneficial?

Decades of prior literature suggests that accessible preferences are beneficial for coping with decision demands. However, four experiments demonstrate that accessible attitudes have drawbacks when others' attitudes are either unknown or conflict with one's own preferences. Our findings challenge commonly held assumptions about attitude function and implicate cross-cultural attitude theory.



Citation:

Aaron Jeffrey Barnes and Sharon Shavitt (2018) ,"Deny the Voice Inside: Are Accessible Attitudes Always Beneficial?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 314-317.

Authors

Aaron Jeffrey Barnes, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Sharon Shavitt, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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