Felt Ambivalence: Exploring the Storage Structure and Role of Situational Relevance on the Accessibility of Dominant and Conflicting Reactions

We explore the underlying structure of oppositely-valenced reactions for an ambivalent object and its impact on accessibility. Evidence suggests that dominant and conflicting reactions are stored together in memory. Further, situational relevance is found to reduce the importance of conflicting reactions, further, inhibiting their accessibility to minimize felt ambivalence.



Citation:

Amit Surendra Singh and H. Rao Unnava (2018) ,"Felt Ambivalence: Exploring the Storage Structure and Role of Situational Relevance on the Accessibility of Dominant and Conflicting Reactions", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 314-317.

Authors

Amit Surendra Singh, Ohio State University, USA
H. Rao Unnava, University of California, Davis



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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