I4. Pink Tax: Are Some Marketing Practices Discriminatory?

Are some marketing mix elements inherently unethical? For example, via the “pink tax” products aimed at women are priced higher than similar products aimed at men. While segmentation, targeting and differentiation are legal, can they become unethical? This study explores this phenomenon using the pink tax as the research context.



Citation:

Andrea Rochelle Bennett, Audhesh Paswan, and Kate Goins (2018) ,"I4. Pink Tax: Are Some Marketing Practices Discriminatory?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 900-900.

Authors

Andrea Rochelle Bennett, University of North Texas
Audhesh Paswan, University of North Texas
Kate Goins, University of North Texas



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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