Saving For Experiences Versus Material Goods

Consideration of future experiential (vs. material) consumption better encourages consumers to save. In a field experiment with financial-service customers, emphasis on experiential purchases generated greater interest in saving. Further, in two scenario-based experiments, participants allocated more money to saving when considering an aspirational experience, compared to a material good.



Citation:

Grant E. Donnelly, Masha Ksendzova, and Michael Norton (2018) ,"Saving For Experiences Versus Material Goods", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 323-327.

Authors

Grant E. Donnelly, Harvard Business School, USA
Masha Ksendzova, Boston University, USA
Michael Norton, Harvard Business School, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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