K6. Persuading the Moral Consumer: Matching Messages to Attitude Basis

We explored the persuasive effects of moral versus practical counter-attitudinal messages on individuals with varying levels of moral conviction toward recycling. Across two studies, when pro-recycling moral conviction was high, the moral (vs. practical) anti-recycling message was more persuasive, but the effects reversed when moral conviction was low.



Citation:

Aviva Philipp-Muller, Andrew Luttrell, and Richard Petty (2018) ,"K6. Persuading the Moral Consumer: Matching Messages to Attitude Basis", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 925-925.

Authors

Aviva Philipp-Muller, Ohio State University, USA
Andrew Luttrell, Ball State University
Richard Petty, Ohio State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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