A11. When Political Neutrality Backfires

Politicians and public figures often refrain from taking sides on hot-button social issues to avoid alienating potential supporters. Two studies (n=751) find that this strategy can backfire: Neutrality is sometimes interpreted as indicating a strong, strategically concealed opinion, and can lead to diminished trustworthiness and voting support in such cases.



Citation:

Ike Silver, Alex Shaw, and Rob Kurzban (2018) ,"A11. When Political Neutrality Backfires", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 928-928.

Authors

Ike Silver, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Alex Shaw, University of Chicago, USA
Rob Kurzban, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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