Doing Worse But Feeling Better: Consequences of Collective Choice

Two studies demonstrate that the decision process of a group of two people is essentially cooperative. This leads dyad members to sacrifice their favorite alternatives, making them choose an alternative with an inferior value comparatively to individuals. Additionally, and contrary to individuals, dyads’ decision process is dominated by positive emotion.



Citation:

Nuno Jose Lopes and Elena Reutskaja (2018) ,"Doing Worse But Feeling Better: Consequences of Collective Choice", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 690-391.

Authors

Nuno Jose Lopes, University of Navarra
Elena Reutskaja, IESE Business School



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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