When Less Is More - How Making Products More Personal Can Decrease Purchase Intention

Recently, companies started to provide personal information of product developers with the products they sell (i.e., personization). This article demonstrates how personization drives perceptions of anthropomorphization and uniqueness. Also, personization decreases purchase intention for intimate products (e.g., shower gel), explained by a perceived intrusion into consumers’ privacy.



Citation:

Michael Schulz (2018) ,"When Less Is More - How Making Products More Personal Can Decrease Purchase Intention", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 783-784.

Authors

Michael Schulz, University of Cologne



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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