When Less Is More - How Making Products More Personal Can Decrease Purchase Intention

Recently, companies started to provide personal information of product developers with the products they sell (i.e., personization). This article demonstrates how personization drives perceptions of anthropomorphization and uniqueness. Also, personization decreases purchase intention for intimate products (e.g., shower gel), explained by a perceived intrusion into consumers’ privacy.



Citation:

Michael Schulz (2018) ,"When Less Is More - How Making Products More Personal Can Decrease Purchase Intention", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 783-784.

Authors

Michael Schulz, University of Cologne



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Data... the 'Hard' & 'Soft' of it: Impact of Embodied Metaphors on Attitude Strength

Sunaina Shrivastava, University of Iowa, USA
Gaurav Jain, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
JaeHwan Kwon, Baylor University
Dhananjay Nayakankuppam, University of Iowa, USA

Read More

Featured

P5. Can(Can’t) Control, thus Try to Save (Earn): The Joint Effect of Perceived Control and Financial Deprivation on Financial Decisions

Min Jung Kim, Manhattan College

Read More

Featured

Boomerang Effect: How Sustainable Disposal Options Spur Green Consumers to Overconsume

Sommer Kapitan, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
Saerom Lee, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Eunjoo Han, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.