The Effects of Being Time Poor and Time Rich on Happiness

In two largescale datasets, we find and replicate a negative quadratic relationship between discretionary time and life satisfaction. These results show that while having too little time is linked to lower levels of life satisfaction, having more time does not lead to greater life satisfaction, and can even reduce it.



Citation:

Marissa Sharif, Cassie Mogilner, and Hal Hershfield (2018) ,"The Effects of Being Time Poor and Time Rich on Happiness", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 303-308.

Authors

Marissa Sharif, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Cassie Mogilner, University of California Los Angeles, USA
Hal Hershfield, University of California Los Angeles, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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