Enhancing the Effectiveness of Narratives Among Vaccine-Skeptical Parents

Vaccine-skeptics do not trust immunization recommendations and cause problems for public health. Among vaccine-skeptics we test how the mentioning of protagonists’ vaccine-skepticism increases the effectiveness of anecdotal messages. A narrative that portrayed vaccine-skeptical protagonists in a positive way produced the highest intention to vaccinate. Our findings are easy to implement.



Citation:

Sandra Praxmarer-Carus and Stefan Wolkenstoerfer (2018) ,"Enhancing the Effectiveness of Narratives Among Vaccine-Skeptical Parents", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 425-429.

Authors

Sandra Praxmarer-Carus, Universität der Bundeswehr München
Stefan Wolkenstoerfer, Universität der Bundeswehr München



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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