E5. Volunteer Motivations For Direct Versus Indirect Service

Nonprofit organizations rely heavily on volunteers, yet recruitment and retention of volunteers is a major challenge. We explore the different motivations for volunteer tasks, finding that different drivers of behavior (categorized by the Volunteer Functions Inventory) correspond differently to indirect and direct service activities that require differing levels of skill.



Citation:

Abigail Schneider and Eric Hamerman (2018) ,"E5. Volunteer Motivations For Direct Versus Indirect Service", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 927-927.

Authors

Abigail Schneider, Regis University
Eric Hamerman, Iona College



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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