A3. Why People Still Do Not Trust Algorithmic Advice in Decision Making

The current research examines why people don’t trust on algorithmic advice in decision making and verifies the underlying mechanism of this effect. The present study shows that people trust advice from algorithms less than advice from people and low trust in the algorithm is caused by the low attribution externality.



Citation:

JAEWON HWANG and Dong Il Lee (2018) ,"A3. Why People Still Do Not Trust Algorithmic Advice in Decision Making", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 910-910.

Authors

JAEWON HWANG, Sejong University
Dong Il Lee, Sejong University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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