F11. Anti-Consumption For Sustainability: the Environmental Impact of Anti-Consumption Lifestyles, Environmentally Concerned Individuals and Ethical Consumers

We compare the environmental impact of anti-consumption lifestyles, ethical consumption and environmental concern. Environmental impact is lowest for tightwadism (i.e. an anti-consumption lifestyle), unrelated with environmental concern, and highest for ethical consumption. Such findings suggest that resisting consumption offers a viable and effective way towards sustainable consumption.



Citation:

Laurie Touchette and Marcelo Vinhal Nepomuceno (2018) ,"F11. Anti-Consumption For Sustainability: the Environmental Impact of Anti-Consumption Lifestyles, Environmentally Concerned Individuals and Ethical Consumers", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 931-931.

Authors

Laurie Touchette, HEC Montreal, Canada
Marcelo Vinhal Nepomuceno, HEC Montreal, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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