Always Trust in Your Friends? Cross-Cultural Effects of Review Source and Incentives on Trustworthiness

Will culture affect how consumers perceive incentivized reviews from friends? Amongst Taiwanese participants, incentivized reviews were deemed as breach of trust. Thus, incentivized reviews from friends were deemed less trustworthy than incentivized reviews from strangers. Amongst Americans, reviews from friends were more trustworthy than reviews from strangers regardless of incentive.



Citation:

Dionysius Ang (2018) ,"Always Trust in Your Friends? Cross-Cultural Effects of Review Source and Incentives on Trustworthiness", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 941-941.

Authors

Dionysius Ang, Leeds University Business School



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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