The Impact of Childhood Exposure to Interparental Conflict on Consumer Response to Online Reviews

We show that adult consumers who witnessed high levels of interparental conflict during childhood evaluate the product less favorably when product reviews exhibit less (vs. more) consensus of opinion, and this avoidance of less consensus is driven by higher pessimism levels.



Citation:

Mengmeng Liu, Maureen Morrin, and Boyoun Grace Chae (2018) ,"The Impact of Childhood Exposure to Interparental Conflict on Consumer Response to Online Reviews", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 686-686.

Authors

Mengmeng Liu, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
Maureen Morrin, Temple University, USA
Boyoun Grace Chae, Temple University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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