Trapped in the Rabbit Hole: Life History Strategies Modulate the Impact of Mild Stress on Hedonic Consumption

We examine how and when consumer life history strategies –short-term, reward-sensitive (fast) vs. long-term, goal-oriented (slow) foci- affect food-related decision-making. Three experiments demonstrate that consumers with fast, but not slow, life-history strategies are more sensitive to mild stress levels, boosting hedonic food consumption, especially when foods are presented as scarce.



Citation:

Bob Fennis, Justina Gineikiene, Dovile Barauskaite, and Guido M. van Koningsbruggen (2018) ,"Trapped in the Rabbit Hole: Life History Strategies Modulate the Impact of Mild Stress on Hedonic Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 541-542.

Authors

Bob Fennis, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Justina Gineikiene, ISM University of Management and Economics
Dovile Barauskaite, ISM University of Management and Economics
Guido M. van Koningsbruggen, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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