Q11. the Effect of Message Ephemerality on Information Processing

Ephemeral communication - the transmission of messages which can be accessed only a limited number of times - is ubiquitous in social interactions (e.g., verbal conversations, Snapchat messaging). In three studies, we find that message ephemerality increases attention, improves memory recall, and leads to longer observation time.



Citation:

Uri Barnea, Robert Meyer, and Gideon Nave (2018) ,"Q11. the Effect of Message Ephemerality on Information Processing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 899-899.

Authors

Uri Barnea, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Robert Meyer, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Gideon Nave, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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