Just Let the “New Me” Do It: How Anticipated Temporal Landmarks Cause Procrastination

We propose that anticipating a temporal landmark (e.g., New Year) has a detrimental effect on one’s motivation for continued goal pursuit. Anticipated temporal landmark divides one’s current and future selves as two separate agents, and the current self shifts the responsibility for the current goal to the new, future self.



Citation:

Minjung Koo, Ke Michael Mai, Hengchen Dai, and Eunyoung Camilla Song (2018) ,"Just Let the “New Me” Do It: How Anticipated Temporal Landmarks Cause Procrastination", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 657-657.

Authors

Minjung Koo, Sungkyunkwan University
Ke Michael Mai, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Hengchen Dai, University of California Los Angeles, USA
Eunyoung Camilla Song, University of Florida, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Consuming Products with Experiences: Why and When Consumers Want Mementos

Charlene Chu, Chapman University
Suzanne Shu, University of California Los Angeles, USA

Read More

Featured

Self-Deprecation Signals Humility, but Not as Much as Self-Deprecators Assume

Clayton R Critcher, University of California Berkeley, USA
Michael O'Donnell, University of California Berkeley, USA
Minah Jung, New York University, USA

Read More

Featured

J11. The Myth of Return – Success or Failure? Consumer Identity and Belonging in the Case of Repatriate Migrants

Sonja N. Kralj, University of Augsburg, Germany
Michael Paul, University of Augsburg, Germany

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.