Just Let the “New Me” Do It: How Anticipated Temporal Landmarks Cause Procrastination

We propose that anticipating a temporal landmark (e.g., New Year) has a detrimental effect on one’s motivation for continued goal pursuit. Anticipated temporal landmark divides one’s current and future selves as two separate agents, and the current self shifts the responsibility for the current goal to the new, future self.



Citation:

Minjung Koo, Ke Michael Mai, Hengchen Dai, and Eunyoung Camilla Song (2018) ,"Just Let the “New Me” Do It: How Anticipated Temporal Landmarks Cause Procrastination", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 657-657.

Authors

Minjung Koo, Sungkyunkwan University
Ke Michael Mai, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Hengchen Dai, University of California Los Angeles, USA
Eunyoung Camilla Song, University of Florida, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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