Just Let the “New Me” Do It: How Anticipated Temporal Landmarks Cause Procrastination

We propose that anticipating a temporal landmark (e.g., New Year) has a detrimental effect on one’s motivation for continued goal pursuit. Anticipated temporal landmark divides one’s current and future selves as two separate agents, and the current self shifts the responsibility for the current goal to the new, future self.



Citation:

Minjung Koo, Ke Michael Mai, Hengchen Dai, and Eunyoung Camilla Song (2018) ,"Just Let the “New Me” Do It: How Anticipated Temporal Landmarks Cause Procrastination", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 657-657.

Authors

Minjung Koo, Sungkyunkwan University
Ke Michael Mai, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Hengchen Dai, University of California Los Angeles, USA
Eunyoung Camilla Song, University of Florida, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

The Dark Side of Luxury: The Social Costs of Conspicuous Consumption

Christopher Cannon, Northwestern University, USA
Derek Rucker, Northwestern University, USA

Read More

Featured

E3. Having Power, Giving More? The Effect of Psychological Power on Consumers’ Charitable Giving of Time

Wumei Liu, Lanzhou University

Read More

Featured

Can Making Family Salient Improve Retirement Contributions? Evidence from Field Experiments in Mexico

Avni Shah, University of Toronto, Canada
Matthew Osborne, University of Toronto, Canada
Jaclyn Lefkowitz, IDEAS42
Andrew Fertig, IDEAS42
Dilip Soman, University of Toronto, Canada
Nina Mazar, Boston University, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.