D11. a Hidden Cost of Advocating: Attitude Depolarization After Recommending

The consequences of word-of-mouth recommendations on advocators themselves have largely been neglected in consumer research. The current work demonstrates paradoxical effects of advocacy on consumer attitudes, by illustrating reduced-level product evaluations following a consumer word-of-mouth episode. The results demonstrate a self-persuasion theory-based depolarization effect, mediated by metacognitive processing.



Citation:

Ravini Savindya Abeywickrama, Gergely Nyilasy, and Simon M. Laham (2018) ,"D11. a Hidden Cost of Advocating: Attitude Depolarization After Recommending", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 897-897.

Authors

Ravini Savindya Abeywickrama, University of Melbourne, Australia
Gergely Nyilasy, University of Melbourne, Australia
Simon M. Laham, University of Melbourne, Australia



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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