D11. a Hidden Cost of Advocating: Attitude Depolarization After Recommending

The consequences of word-of-mouth recommendations on advocators themselves have largely been neglected in consumer research. The current work demonstrates paradoxical effects of advocacy on consumer attitudes, by illustrating reduced-level product evaluations following a consumer word-of-mouth episode. The results demonstrate a self-persuasion theory-based depolarization effect, mediated by metacognitive processing.



Citation:

Ravini Savindya Abeywickrama, Gergely Nyilasy, and Simon M. Laham (2018) ,"D11. a Hidden Cost of Advocating: Attitude Depolarization After Recommending", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 897-897.

Authors

Ravini Savindya Abeywickrama, University of Melbourne, Australia
Gergely Nyilasy, University of Melbourne, Australia
Simon M. Laham, University of Melbourne, Australia



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

P8. Understanding Financial Literacy: a Meta-Analysis of the Antecedents, Consequents and Moderators

FERNANDO DE OLIVEIRA SANTINI, UNIVERSIDADE DO VALE DO RIO DOS SINOS - UNISINOS
Frederike Monika Budiner Mette, ESPM, Brazil
Mateus Canniatti Ponchio, ESPM, Brazil
Wagner Junior Ladeira, Unisinos

Read More

Featured

R2. Brand-to-Brand Communications: How Consumers React to Flattery Between Brands

Lingrui Zhou, Duke University, USA
Katherine Crain, Duke University, USA
Keisha Cutright, Duke University, USA

Read More

Featured

H4. Anthropomorphism Moderates the Effect of Ownership on Self Perceptions

Qiang Zhou, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Dengfeng Yan, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.