Handshaking Promotes Deal-Making By Signaling Cooperative Intent

We explore the impact of a ubiquitous form of greeting—a handshake—on cooperation. Although people do not expect handshakes to affect negotiation outcomes, two correlational studies and five experiments demonstrate that handshakes can induce cooperation in negotiations and economic games.



Citation:

Juliana Schroeder, Jane Risen, Francesca Gino, and Michael Norton (2018) ,"Handshaking Promotes Deal-Making By Signaling Cooperative Intent", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 39-44.

Authors

Juliana Schroeder, University of California Berkeley, USA
Jane Risen, University of Chicago, USA
Francesca Gino, Harvard Business School, USA
Michael Norton, Harvard Business School, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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