Only "$20 More": Additional Price Framing Increases the Choice of Upgraded Products and Services

We show that upgraded products are more popular when presented using Additional Price Framing ("for $20 more") rather than Inclusive Framing ("for $60 total"), because people focus on the smaller price value when judging expensiveness. This effect is restricted to pricing contexts and is robust to several variations.



Citation:

Thomas Allard, David Hardisty, and Dale Griffin (2018) ,"Only "$20 More": Additional Price Framing Increases the Choice of Upgraded Products and Services", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 328-332.

Authors

Thomas Allard, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
David Hardisty, University of British Columbia, Canada
Dale Griffin, University of British Columbia, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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