If No One Saw It on Instagram, Was It Any Good? Examining Received Attention As a Social Benefit of Experiential Consumption

The present research demonstrates that the ability of a shared experience to attract attention (i.e., views) is viewed as a social benefit of consumption (i.e., increases social self-esteem), which increases experiential satisfaction. These effects are dependent on consumers’ attention expectations and their desire to attract attention (i.e., attention preferences).



Citation:

Matthew J Hall and Jamie D. Hyodo (2018) ,"If No One Saw It on Instagram, Was It Any Good? Examining Received Attention As a Social Benefit of Experiential Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 579-580.

Authors

Matthew J Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Jamie D. Hyodo, University of Nebraska-Lincoln



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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