The Price of a Threat: How Social Identity Threat Influences Price Sensitivity

Traditional economic theory suggests that poor consumers are more price sensitive than their wealthier counterparts. The current article demonstrates that even when identity-vulnerable (i.e., poor) consumers can exert price sensitivity, they often choose not to do so in a systematic attempt to circumvent identity threats in intergroup contact marketplace.



Citation:

Jorge Rodrigues JACOB, Yan Vieites, Eduardo B. Andrade, and Rafael Burstein Goldszmidt (2018) ,"The Price of a Threat: How Social Identity Threat Influences Price Sensitivity", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 608-609.

Authors

Jorge Rodrigues JACOB, Brazilian School of Public and Business Administration, Brazil
Yan Vieites, Brazilian School of Public and Business Administration, Brazil
Eduardo B. Andrade, FGV / EBAPE
Rafael Burstein Goldszmidt, Brazilian School of Public and Business Administration, Brazil



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

B9. The Power of Self-Effacing Brand Messages: Building Trust and Increasing Brand Attitudes

Tessa Garcia-Collart, Florida International University
Jessica Rixom, University of Nevada, Reno

Read More

Featured

H7. Too Risky to Be Luxurious: Stigmatized Luxury Product Attributes Can Weaken or Increase Social Risk to Determine Conspicuous Consumption

Jerry Lewis Grimes, Grenoble Ecole de Management
Yan Meng, Grenoble Ecole de Management

Read More

Featured

The Subjective Value of Popularity: A Neural Account of Socially Informed Functional Value and Social Value

Robert Goedegebure, Wageningen University, The Netherlands
Irene Tijssen, Wageningen University, The Netherlands
Nynke van der Laan, University of Amsterdam
Hans van Trijp, Wageningen University, The Netherlands

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.