P2. the Upside of Myopic Loss Aversion

Broad brackets lead to increased risk taking, which is normative without reinvestment but can be disastrous with reinvestment. In our study, narrow bracketed participants are more loss averse—a better decision—yielding higher expected log wealth. Myopia can be good.



Citation:

Daniel Wall and Gretchen Chapman (2018) ,"P2. the Upside of Myopic Loss Aversion", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 932-932.

Authors

Daniel Wall, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Gretchen Chapman, Carnegie Mellon University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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