On Politics, Morality, and Consumer Response to Negative Publicity

This research demonstrates that political ideology influences consumer responses to non-partisan negative publicity brand events by shaping their moral belief systems. Using experimental and big data methods, we show that liberals (vs. conservatives) endorse individuals’ rights (vs. duty)-based moral beliefs, leading to divergent attitudes toward brands under negative publicity.



Citation:

Chethana Achar and Nidhi Agrawal (2018) ,"On Politics, Morality, and Consumer Response to Negative Publicity", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 451-452.

Authors

Chethana Achar, University of Washington, USA
Nidhi Agrawal, University of Washington, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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