The Secrecy Effect: Secret Consumption Polarizes Product Evaluations

Results from six studies show that secret consumption prompts resulted in more extreme (polarized) product evaluations. Well-liked products received more positive evaluations, and disliked products received more negative evaluations, compared to evaluations in non-secret conditions. We identify preoccupation and attitude polarization as the primary drivers for these outcomes.



Citation:

Maria A Rodas and Deborah Roedder John (2018) ,"The Secrecy Effect: Secret Consumption Polarizes Product Evaluations", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 144-148.

Authors

Maria A Rodas, University of Minnesota, USA
Deborah Roedder John, University of Minnesota, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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