Believing in and Reacting to Rumors: the Role of Congruity and Nature of Existing Predisposition

This study observes that while people do distinguish misinformation from facts, in certain scenarios the verification mechanism breaks down. Paradoxically, this distinction is stringent while evaluating congruent information (compared to incongruent information) especially to avoid false hopes (than false anxieties); minimum distinction occurs while evaluating positive information about disliked entity.



Citation:

Satadruta Mookherjee and Subimal Chatterjee (2018) ,"Believing in and Reacting to Rumors: the Role of Congruity and Nature of Existing Predisposition", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 702-703.

Authors

Satadruta Mookherjee, SUNY Binghamton, USA
Subimal Chatterjee, SUNY Binghamton, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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