Believing in and Reacting to Rumors: the Role of Congruity and Nature of Existing Predisposition

This study observes that while people do distinguish misinformation from facts, in certain scenarios the verification mechanism breaks down. Paradoxically, this distinction is stringent while evaluating congruent information (compared to incongruent information) especially to avoid false hopes (than false anxieties); minimum distinction occurs while evaluating positive information about disliked entity.



Citation:

Satadruta Mookherjee and Subimal Chatterjee (2018) ,"Believing in and Reacting to Rumors: the Role of Congruity and Nature of Existing Predisposition", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 702-703.

Authors

Satadruta Mookherjee, SUNY Binghamton, USA
Subimal Chatterjee, SUNY Binghamton, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Turning “Expenses” into “Bills”: How spending Categorization Impacts Budget Optimism and Likelihood of Success

Eleanor Putnam-Farr, Rice University, USA
Anastasiya Pocheptsova Ghosh, University of Arizona, USA

Read More

Featured

G5. The Phenomenon of Brand Noise and Related Consumer Preferences in the Luxury Industry

Daria Erkhova, University of Bern
Elena Ehrensperger, University of Bern
Harley Krohmer, University of Bern
Wayne Hoyer, University of Texas at Austin, USA
John Zhang, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Read More

Featured

Alternative Worldviews on Human – Nonhuman Relations: The Turkish Case

N. Alican Mecit, HEC Paris, France
tina m. lowrey, HEC Paris, France

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.