I8. How Food Images on Social Media Influence Online Reactions

The results of four studies, including two field experiments, show that an image of a female gets fewer positive online reactions and is evaluated less favorably when she is pictured next to an unhealthy (vs. a healthy) item; these effects get reversed for males.



Citation:

Annika Abell and Dipayan Biswas (2018) ,"I8. How Food Images on Social Media Influence Online Reactions", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 897-897.

Authors

Annika Abell, University of South Florida, USA
Dipayan Biswas, University of South Florida, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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