O6. Be Aware of Your Suspicion: When “Being Suspicious” Ironically Leads to Suboptimal Judgment- and Decision-Making

Contrary to the belief that “being suspicious” benefits judgment- and decision-making, four studies demonstrate the opposite to hold true. Suspicion rendered judgments and decisions suboptimal for money and food in an unrelated context. As suspicion is ever-prevailing in nowadays’ marketplace, these findings highlight relevant and important consequences for consumer welfare.



Citation:

Julie Verstraeten, Tina Tessitore, and Maggie Geuens (2018) ,"O6. Be Aware of Your Suspicion: When “Being Suspicious” Ironically Leads to Suboptimal Judgment- and Decision-Making", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 931-931.

Authors

Julie Verstraeten, Ghent University, Belgium
Tina Tessitore, INSEEC Business School, France
Maggie Geuens, Ghent University, Belgium



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

J1. The Effect of Identity Abstractness on Information Processing Styles

Woojin Choi, University of Seoul
Min Jung Kim, Manhattan College
HyukJin Kwon, University of Seoul
Jiyun Kang, Texas State University

Read More

Featured

The Impact of Implicit Rate of Change on Arousal and Subjective Ratings

James A Mourey, DePaul University, USA
Ryan Elder, Brigham Young University, USA

Read More

Featured

The Secrecy Effect: Secret Consumption Polarizes Product Evaluations

Maria A Rodas, University of Minnesota, USA
Deborah Roedder John, University of Minnesota, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.