O6. Be Aware of Your Suspicion: When “Being Suspicious” Ironically Leads to Suboptimal Judgment- and Decision-Making

Contrary to the belief that “being suspicious” benefits judgment- and decision-making, four studies demonstrate the opposite to hold true. Suspicion rendered judgments and decisions suboptimal for money and food in an unrelated context. As suspicion is ever-prevailing in nowadays’ marketplace, these findings highlight relevant and important consequences for consumer welfare.



Citation:

Julie Verstraeten, Tina Tessitore, and Maggie Geuens (2018) ,"O6. Be Aware of Your Suspicion: When “Being Suspicious” Ironically Leads to Suboptimal Judgment- and Decision-Making", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 931-931.

Authors

Julie Verstraeten, Ghent University, Belgium
Tina Tessitore, INSEEC Business School, France
Maggie Geuens, Ghent University, Belgium



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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