Changes in Environment Restore Self-Control

Does changing environments help or hurt your self-control? In three experiments, we suggest that changing environments, whether real or imagined, restores self-control after prior self-control exertion. Consistent with theorizing, self-control restoration was specific to change; mere distraction or physical movement were not sufficient.



Citation:

Nicole Mead and Jonathan Levav (2018) ,"Changes in Environment Restore Self-Control", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 110-114.

Authors

Nicole Mead, University of Melbourne, Australia
Jonathan Levav, Stanford University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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