People Overpredict the Benefit of Using Expensive Items and Appearing Rich in Friend-Making

Four studies (including a field study) find that people predict that others are more willing to befriend them if they use expensive items and appear rich, but in reality others are more willing to befriend those who do not. This self-other discrepancy occurs because people misconstrue others’ purpose of friend-making.



Citation:

Xilin Li and Christopher Hsee (2018) ,"People Overpredict the Benefit of Using Expensive Items and Appearing Rich in Friend-Making", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 199-203.

Authors

Xilin Li, University of Chicago, USA
Christopher Hsee, University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Inequality and Market (In)efficiency

Serena Hagerty, Harvard Business School, USA
Michael Norton, Harvard Business School, USA

Read More

Featured

The Impostor Syndrome from Luxury Consumption

Dafna Goor, Harvard Business School, USA
Nailya Ordabayeva, Boston College, USA
Anat Keinan, Harvard Business School, USA
Sandrine Crener, Harvard Business School, USA

Read More

Featured

Less Time, More Procrastination? The Impact of Time Pressure on Task Initiation

Jing Jiang, Renmin University of China
Alisa Yinghao Wu, Columbia University, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.