People Overpredict the Benefit of Using Expensive Items and Appearing Rich in Friend-Making

Four studies (including a field study) find that people predict that others are more willing to befriend them if they use expensive items and appear rich, but in reality others are more willing to befriend those who do not. This self-other discrepancy occurs because people misconstrue others’ purpose of friend-making.



Citation:

Xilin Li and Christopher Hsee (2018) ,"People Overpredict the Benefit of Using Expensive Items and Appearing Rich in Friend-Making", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 199-203.

Authors

Xilin Li, University of Chicago, USA
Christopher Hsee, University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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