The Messy Satiation Effect: the Benefits of Eating Like a Pig

Changing the visual appearance of food during consumption increases satiation when a food becomes messy (unattractive) and decreases satiation when a food remains clean (attractive). Additionally, how appetizing a food stays over consumption mediates this effect, and less guilt arises when rejecting unattractive food than rejecting or overeating attractive food.



Citation:

Kevin L. Sample and Kelly Haws (2018) ,"The Messy Satiation Effect: the Benefits of Eating Like a Pig", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 127-132.

Authors

Kevin L. Sample, University of Georgia, USA
Kelly Haws, Vanderbilt University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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