Using a Meta-Analysis to Unravel Relative Importance of Postulated Explanations For the Endowment Effect

A meta-analysis, based on hierarchical modeling and bootstrapping, tests the relative explanatory power of drivers of the endowment effect. Results show biased information processing is the leading explanatory account, relative to ownership and misrepresentation. Ownership accounts are not all equal; implicit self-threat (vs. possession-self link) is the more dominant component.



Citation:

Peter Nguyen, Xin (Shane) Wang, and David J. Curry (2018) ,"Using a Meta-Analysis to Unravel Relative Importance of Postulated Explanations For the Endowment Effect", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 86-91.

Authors

Peter Nguyen, Ivey Business School
Xin (Shane) Wang, Western University, Canada
David J. Curry, University of Cincinnati, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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