The Experiential Advantage: a Meta-Analysis

We meta-analyze the experiential advantage literature (Van Boven and Gilovich 2003) comparing material purchases to experiential purchases in 129 studies. While measures of happiness had a “small-to-medium” effect size overall (d = .26), measures of impressions and personal identity had directionally larger effect sizes (d = .45).



Citation:

Evan Weingarten and Joseph K Goodman (2018) ,"The Experiential Advantage: a Meta-Analysis", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 86-91.

Authors

Evan Weingarten, University of California San Diego, USA
Joseph K Goodman, Ohio State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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