The Impostor Syndrome From Luxury Consumption

While luxury consumption can yield benefits for consumers, it can also make consumers feel inauthentic, producing the paradox of luxury consumption. This phenomenon is explained by the perceived gap between consumers’ true and projected selves, predicted by consumers’ psychological entitlement, and moderated by detectability and malleability of the gap.



Citation:

Dafna Goor, Nailya Ordabayeva, Anat Keinan, and Sandrine Crener (2018) ,"The Impostor Syndrome From Luxury Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 571-572.

Authors

Dafna Goor, Harvard Business School, USA
Nailya Ordabayeva, Boston College, USA
Anat Keinan, Harvard Business School, USA
Sandrine Crener, Harvard Business School, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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