I, Me, Mine: the Effect of the Explicitness of Self-Anchoring on Consumer Evaluations

This research shows that implicitly-primed self-anchoring creates a halo of positivity around objects for which consumers receive only positive information, and consumers repel objects for which they receive positive and negative information. However, when consumers explicitly self-anchor using an imagination task, they resolve discrepancies in messaging by dissociating negative information.



Citation:

Adrienne E Foos, Kathleen A Keeling, and Debbie I Keeling (2018) ,"I, Me, Mine: the Effect of the Explicitness of Self-Anchoring on Consumer Evaluations", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 554-556.

Authors

Adrienne E Foos, Mercyhurst University
Kathleen A Keeling, University of Manchester, UK
Debbie I Keeling, University of Sussex



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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