Intentionally “Biased”: People Purposefully Use To-Be-Ignored Information, But Can Be Persuaded Not To

Research has repeatedly shown that people fail to disregard to-be-ignored information, concluding that people are unwillingly and unconsciously affected by information. In 6 studies, we argue and provide evidence that very often the problem is not that people cannot ignore information, but that they do not want to ignore information.



Citation:

Berkeley Jay Dietvorst and Uri Simonsohn (2018) ,"Intentionally “Biased”: People Purposefully Use To-Be-Ignored Information, But Can Be Persuaded Not To", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 525-526.

Authors

Berkeley Jay Dietvorst, University of Chicago, USA
Uri Simonsohn, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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