Alternative “Facts”: the Effects of Narrative Processing on the Acceptance of Factual Information

We examine how narrative processing influences the acceptance of beliefs encountered separately from a narrative. We illustrate a cognitive bias: if external facts facilitate understanding of a prior (narrative) message, these then facts are more likely to be perceived as true, even when the facts are learned to be false.



Citation:

Anne Hamby and David Brinberg (2018) ,"Alternative “Facts”: the Effects of Narrative Processing on the Acceptance of Factual Information", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 581-582.

Authors

Anne Hamby, Hofstra University
David Brinberg, Virginia Tech, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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