I1. Blaming Him Or Them? a Study on Attribution Behavior

The current work examines the gender difference in attribution behavior. Results show that males are more likely to blame individuals while females are more likely to blame groups, which can be explained by relational and collective interdependent self-construal. Furthermore, similarity and service failure magnitude moderate the gender effect.



Citation:

Chun Zhang, Michel Laroche, and Yaoqi Li (2018) ,"I1. Blaming Him Or Them? a Study on Attribution Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 938-938.

Authors

Chun Zhang, University of Dayton
Michel Laroche, Concordia University, Canada
Yaoqi Li, Sun Yat-Sen University, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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