I1. Blaming Him Or Them? a Study on Attribution Behavior

The current work examines the gender difference in attribution behavior. Results show that males are more likely to blame individuals while females are more likely to blame groups, which can be explained by relational and collective interdependent self-construal. Furthermore, similarity and service failure magnitude moderate the gender effect.



Citation:

Chun Zhang, Michel Laroche, and Yaoqi Li (2018) ,"I1. Blaming Him Or Them? a Study on Attribution Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 938-938.

Authors

Chun Zhang, University of Dayton
Michel Laroche, Concordia University, Canada
Yaoqi Li, Sun Yat-Sen University, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Social Sharing of Negative Emotions in Virtual Travel Communities

Clara Koetz, Rennes School of Business
Anke Piepenbrink, Rennes School of Business

Read More

Featured

G8. How Does Pronunciation Difficulty of Brand Names Influence Consumer Responses? The Role of Self-Construal

Gunben Ceren Aksu, Rutgers University, USA
Yeni Zhou, Rutgers University, USA
Alokparna (Sonia) Monga, Rutgers University, USA

Read More

Featured

D3. Social Exclusion and WOM about Past versus Future Experiences

Melis Ceylan, Koc University, Turkey
Ezgi Akpinar, Koc University, Turkey
Selin Atalay, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management, Germany

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.