G13. Odor Priming and Product Preferences: When Smells Regulate Preferences For Semantically-Congruent Products and Brands

This article extends the idea that olfactory stimuli influence consumer preferences even when they are perceived unconsciously. Two laboratory experiments demonstrate that incidental exposure to odors unconsciously activate a mental representation when they are matched for valence, and when are related to the intended semantic category, thus regulating product preferences.



Citation:

Ramona De Luca and Delane Botelho (2018) ,"G13. Odor Priming and Product Preferences: When Smells Regulate Preferences For Semantically-Congruent Products and Brands", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 918-918.

Authors

Ramona De Luca, EAESP-FGV
Delane Botelho, EAESP-FGV



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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