The Effects of Subjective Knowledge and Naïve Theory on Consumers’ Inference of Missing Information

Consumers form inferences to estimate the missing product information. Three experiments are conducted to investigate how consumers’ subjective knowledge influence the inference base used to make an inference and to reveal the correction effects of their naïve theory on the inferred results. The correction effect is noticeable on knowledgeable consumers.



Citation:

Lien-Ti Bei and Li Keng Cheng (2018) ,"The Effects of Subjective Knowledge and Naïve Theory on Consumers’ Inference of Missing Information", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 378-381.

Authors

Lien-Ti Bei, National Chengchi Uniersity, Taiwan
Li Keng Cheng, National Chengchi Uniersity, Taiwan



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Attentional Breadth Affects In-store Exploration and Unplanned Purchasing

Mathias Clemens Streicher, University of Innsbruck, Austria
Zachary Estes, Bocconi University, Italy
Oliver B. Büttner, University of Duisburg-Essen

Read More

Featured

Consumers’ Implicit Mindsets and Responses to Cause-related Marketing Campaigns

Meng-Hua Hsieh, Kent State University, USA
Ozge Yucel-Aybat, Pennsylvania State University Harrisburg

Read More

Featured

How Awe Might Be Awesome: The Role of Awe in Consumers’ Food Consumption and Perceptions of Misshapen Produce

Begum Oz, University of Massachusetts, USA
Elizabeth Miller, University of Massachusetts, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.