The Effects of Subjective Knowledge and Naïve Theory on Consumers’ Inference of Missing Information

Consumers form inferences to estimate the missing product information. Three experiments are conducted to investigate how consumers’ subjective knowledge influence the inference base used to make an inference and to reveal the correction effects of their naïve theory on the inferred results. The correction effect is noticeable on knowledgeable consumers.



Citation:

Lien-Ti Bei and Li Keng Cheng (2018) ,"The Effects of Subjective Knowledge and Naïve Theory on Consumers’ Inference of Missing Information", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 378-381.

Authors

Lien-Ti Bei, National Chengchi Uniersity, Taiwan
Li Keng Cheng, National Chengchi Uniersity, Taiwan



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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