Priming & Privacy: How Subtle Trust Cues Online Affect Consumer Disclosure and Purchase Intentions

In five studies, we show how in spite of increasing privacy concerns online (Pilot), people are more likely to disclose highly personal information based on subtle cues of trust including verbal primes (Study 1), social network size (Study 2), friends’ online engagement (Study 3), and privacy policy fluency (Study 4).



Citation:

James A Mourey and Ari Waldman (2018) ,"Priming & Privacy: How Subtle Trust Cues Online Affect Consumer Disclosure and Purchase Intentions", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46, eds. Andrew Gershoff, Robert Kozinets, and Tiffany White, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 704-705.

Authors

James A Mourey, DePaul University, USA
Ari Waldman, New York Law School



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 46 | 2018



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